Part I: commercial leases – The basics

Commercial lease

24 Jan Part I: commercial leases – The basics

Page Hardy Harris are dedicated to helping both tenants and landlords find suitable properties for their individual requirements. So, the focus of today’s blog is clearing up some of the questions you may have about commercial leases.

The majority of businesses need premises to operate from, whether they be for offices, workshops, factories or storage facilities. While some businesses own the premises they operate from, most occupy under a lease paying a market rent.

But, there is more to a commercial lease than just the payment of rent. The below answers to some of the commonly asked questions will give potential business tenants some useful guidance:-

  1. Once I have signed the lease can I get out of it if my business suffers a downturn?

Leases are generally granted for a fixed period of years known as a term.  The lease term can only be ended early by the tenant if, prior to entering the lease the landlord has agreed that the tenant has an option to do so, or, the landlord later agrees to release the tenant from the lease before the term has expired.

If neither of these situations arise, and you cannot find an acceptable replacement tenant for the premises, you may well remain bound to pay the rent and comply with all other obligations until the end of the lease term, even if you have vacated the premises.

  1. I know there will be rent to pay, but are there any other costs I may be responsible for under the lease?

If you are renting part of the landlord’s building such as an office block, you may also have a responsibility to contribute to the upkeep and maintenance of common parts of the whole building such as the roof and structural walls, or other things that are used in common with other occupiers of the landlord’s property, such as lifts or a reception area.  This is often referred to as service charge.

The tenant will also be responsible for the payment of the insurance premium for the premises to cover damage to the premises and also the loss of rent the landlord may suffer if the premises become unusable due to such damage.

There can be a cost if you want to transfer the lease, or sub-let part of the property to someone else, as you will usually need the landlord’s written permission, and the landlord can normally claim the cost of considering whether to agree to the transaction and also drafting and agreeing the form of the written permission.

Finally, you will usually be responsible for the business rates, utilities and any other outgoings in relation to the premises.

  1. If I find that there are repairs required to the premises, am I right to think the landlord will sort them out?

Most commercial landlords not only seek to avoid any responsibility to carry out repairs to the premises, but will actually seek to put the responsibility for putting the property into repair on the tenant’s shoulders.

A tenant who agrees to a full repairing obligation can find himself with a repairing bill running into tens of thousands of pounds when the lease ends, despite the fact that the disrepair pre-dated the lease itself.  A well advised tenant will try to limit his repairing responsibility to keeping it in no worse state than it was at the date of the lease.

For this reason, it is highly recommended that an ingoing tenant obtains a survey to check and record the condition of the premises before they enter into a lease.

 

 

Source: Harrison Drury Solicitors 

Contributor: Hannah Taylor-Brewin

Bracknell office: 01344 311344

Hannah Taylor-Brewin

Bracknell office: 01344 311344

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