Part II: Q & A on taking out a commercial property lease

Commercial lease

30 Jan Part II: Q & A on taking out a commercial property lease

  1. What happens if, after I have taken the lease, I discover there are problems relating to the premises that impact on my business?

The principle of “buyer beware” relates to a tenant taking a lease in the same way that it does to a purchaser buying a property, meaning that a tenant takes a property “warts and all” and he must satisfy himself that it is suitable both physically and legally for the use he intends.

The research into the property carried out by a good lawyer will reveal many things about the property, including whether the landlord actually has the power to grant the lease, any adverse rights that may affect it as well as any rights that benefit the property such as rights of way.

Lawyers can carry out a range of enquiries and searches to discover such things as planning permissions affecting the land, whether the property is connected to the public highway, whether there is any risk that the premises may be on contaminated land, whether the is a risk of subsidence due to historic mining in the area, whether the property is connected to mains utilities and a host of other information.

It is common for tenants who have not been represented by solicitors to enter a lease without finding out any of this information.  If a problem rears its head in such a case, say for instance the property does not have planning permission to use it for the tenant’s business, he will have no comeback against the landlord and the tenant will have to continue paying the rent despite the fact he may have a useless asset.

  1. I’ve heard that a landlord can change the locks of my business premises if I am late paying the rent, is this true?

In short, yes.  The powers of a commercial landlord to deal with non-payment of rent are far-reaching.  Forfeiture is the procedure by which a landlord can terminate a lease and virtually all commercial leases will have a clause allowing the landlord to terminate the lease if the rent is unpaid for a specified number of days, usually somewhere between 14 -28.

Unlike their residential brethren, commercial landlords do not need a court order to retake possession of leased property if their right to forfeit the lease has arisen because of late payment of rent.  Landlords also have the right to send bailiffs in to seize the tenant’s goods and sell them if the rent is unpaid, but legislation will soon come into force to restrict this right.

The above answers cover some basic issues relating to commercial leases, but in reality only scratch the surface of what is a complicated topic.  If you have any queries relating to commercial leases please contact either our Bracknell office on 01344 311344 or Maidenhead office on 01628 439006 for more information.

Source: Harrison Drury Solicitors

Contributor: Hannah Taylor Brewin

Hannah Taylor Brewin

Hannah Taylor Brewin

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